Reports

Voting Machines and the Underestimate of the Bush Vote

Date Published: 
12/05/2004
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
  1. A series of claims have been made in recent days alleging that discrepancies between exit poll results and the presidential vote in certain states provides evidence of malfeasance in those states. These claims seem to be concentrated on states using electronic voting systems.
  2. Exit polls predicted a significantly greater vote for Kerry nationwide than the official results confirmed, but there is not any apparent systematic bias when we take this same analysis to the state level.

Where We Have Been, Where We Are Going: Project Update

Date Published: 
01/01/2003
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
Americans are proud of their democracy. But the controversy over the Florida election recount revealed profound flaws in the way we vote. Immediately after the 2000 election, the smooth transition of government, a hallmark of American democracy, seemed to hang on the workings of antiquated computer technology -- the punch card. Even more profoundly, the 2000 and 2002 elections both revealed that the electoral process itself is evolving due to the impact of new information technologies, especially computer literacy and accessibility.

Voting - What Is, What Could Be

Date Published: 
07/01/2001
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
On December 15, 2000, the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced a collaborative project to develop new voting technology in order "to precent a recurrence of the problems that threatened the 2000 presidential election." The problems in the 2000 election go well beyond voting equipment. This report assesses the magnitude of the problems, their root causes, and how technology can reduce them.

Assessing Electoral Performance in the New Mexico 2010 General Election

Author(s): 
Alex N. Adams
University of New Mexico
Lisa Bryant
The 2010 New Mexico Election Administration Report represents a systematic examination of New Mexico's November 2010 General election. It is the third election report in a series that we began unintentionally in 2006 with our academic partners R. Michael Alvarez, professor at the California Institute of Technology, and Thad E. Hall, associate professor at the University of Utah. To our knowledge, no other state has had the kind of sustained and independent analysis over multiple elections.

Pages