Browse Content

Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

The American Internet Voter

Working Paper No.: 
97
Date Published: 
09/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
Betsy Sinclair
Since the creation of the Internet, there have been a seemingly never-ending number of books and analyses about the role of the Internet in Politics. Many of these books fail to keep in mind that the behavior of elites--well-educated and politically active individuals who often represent the peer group of these authors--is not generally representative of the behavior of the public at large. Pundits and political campaign, but few have systemically examined the role of the Internet in participatory politics for the average voter.

Making Voting Easier: Convenience Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election

Working Paper No.: 
95
Date Published: 
03/15/2010
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Ines Levin
In this study we analyze the choice of voting mode in the 2008 presidential election. We use a large-sample survey with national coverage that allows us to overcome limitations of previous studies. Our analysis provides a number of insights into some of the important debates about convenience voting. Among other things, we find little support for the hypothesis that convenience voting methods have partisan implications; although we do find voter attributes that lead to the choice of some particular convenience voting mode.

Electoral Reform: Charting the Course to Voter Engagement

A nation that can send a man to the moon and that can put a reliable ATM machine on every corner has no excuse not to deploy a reliable, affordable, easy-to-use voting system! Attached is a PDF of the Carnegie Review, which features an article where Mike Alvarez was interviewed on Electoral Reform.

The Human Dimension of Elections: How Poll Workers Shape Public Confidence in Elections

Working Paper No.: 
90
Date Published: 
09/01/2009
Author(s): 
J. Quin Monson
Brigham Young University
Kelly D. Patterson
This article examines the role that poll workers play in the perceptions that voters have about the overall quality of elections and democracy more generally. Although the 2000 election opened up a wideranging examination of the electoral process in the United States, there has been little consideration given to the role of administration and management in the electoral process and in confidence in election outcomes (cf. Hall 2003; Alvarez and Hall 2006).

A Data-Centered Look at the Election of 2008

Working Paper No.: 
88
Date Published: 
09/01/2009
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
MIT
My expertise is in trying to use data to identify where election problems lie in America, especially at a broad level --- such as comparing states with each other or comparing counties with each other. I know that the purpose of today’s conference is to think about LA County, but there are lessons to be learned from looking across the country. So, what I thought I would do today is look at the election of 2008 to ask what do the data tell us about the experience of voters nationwide on Election Day?

Resolving Voter Registration Problems: Making Registration Easier, Less Costly and More Accurate

Working Paper No.: 
87
Date Published: 
08/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
R. Michael Alvarez
Introduction The practice of voter registration has a long history in the United States. In 1800, Massachusetts was the first state to impose a voter registration requirement. By Reconstruction, voter registration was used in a handful of states, typically in urban areas, as a tool to prevent multiple voting. By early in the twentieth century, most states required voter registration.

Voting Technology and Innovation

Working Paper No.: 
86
Date Published: 
08/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 election was different from the last two presidential elections in that there was a clear winner on Election Day and the winner was a Democrat, Barack Obama. Controversies over voting technology that raged in 2000 and 2004 were relatively dormant. Instead, the election controversies that did come up were mostly discussions of lines to vote. This lack of discussion does not mean that there were not important issues related to voting technology that took place in 2008, just that they were not things deemed important by the media.

2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections

Working Paper No.: 
81
Date Published: 
07/01/2009
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
MIT
Survey Background • Gauging the quality of the voting experience • Research design – 200 respondents contacted in every state, or 10,000 total – Survey in the field the week following Nov. 4 – Pilot surveys conducted on in Nov. ’07 and Super Tuesday ’08 – Parallel nationwide survey • Limited set of questions • 32,800 total respondents

2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections

Charles Stewart is giving a presentation at the IACREOT 38th Annual Summer Conference & Trade Show in Spokane, Washington this week (July 7-11, 2009). Attached is his presentation on the 2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections.

Voting Technology and Innovation

Working Paper No.: 
78
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 election was different from the last two presidential elections in that there was a clear winner on Election Day and the winner was a Democrat, Barack Obama. Controversies over voting technology that raged in 2000 and 2004 were relatively dormant. Instead, the election controversies that did come up were mostly discussions of lines to vote.1 This lack of discussion does not mean that there were not important issues related to voting technology that took place in 2008, just that they were not things deemed important by the media.

Pages