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Voter Attitudes Toward Poll Workers in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
77
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
At a conference on election reform held by the National Academies of Science in 2004, Indiana’s Secretary of State, Todd Rokita, referred to poll workers as “the street level lawyers” of elections. The reason for his statement was obvious: poll workers, in polling places, are the people who determine how well an election is run and have the power over its implementation (Alvarez and Hall 2006; Claassen, Magleby, Monson, and Patterson 2008; Hall, Monson, and Patterson, forthcoming).

Correcting for Survey Misreports using Auxiliary Information with an Application to Estimating Turnout

Working Paper No.: 
74
Date Published: 
05/01/2009
Author(s): 
Jonathan N. Katz
California Institute of Technology
Gabriel Katz
Abstract

Is There Racial Discrimination at the Polls? Voters' Experience in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
73
Date Published: 
03/01/2009
Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
Harvard University
In 1965, the United States Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act to end discrimination against black voters at the polls in Southern states and throughout the nation. The Act prohibited the use of “tests” and other devices used to prevent people from voting. At issue was not the content of tests themselves but the wide latitude available to those charged with registering and authenticating voters.

E-Voting: Perspectives and Experiences

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Edited by S Jaya Krishna and Naveen Kumar
Chapter 14
Lessons and Trends in E-Voting: Initiatives in the US and Abroad by R. Michael Alvarez and Thad E. Hall

Election Technology and the Voting Experience in 2008

Working Paper No.: 
71
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Draft of March 25, 2009

2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections

Date Published: 
03/01/2009
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech; Thad Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections is the first comprehensive nationwide study of how voters experienced the administration of elections in the United States. The main part of the survey involved interviewing 10,000 registered voters (200 in each state) over the Internet. An additional 2,000 registered voters were interviewed in ten states, providing the opportunity to compare how interview respondents answer questions about election administration in these two survey modes. Also included is the Final Report: Executive Summary

United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration

News from Chairman Schumer Schumer Reveals Groundbreaking New Study from Voting Experts: Up to 7 Million Registered Voters were Prevented or Discouraged from Casting Ballots in '08 Election

Election Day Went Smoothly But Trouble Spots Remain, Survey Shows

WASHINGTON, Dec 09, 2008 /PRNewswire-USNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Pew Center on the States and the JEHT Foundation Commit $8 Million in 2009 to Modernize Election System

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