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Election Day Went Smoothly But Trouble Spots Remain, Survey Shows

WASHINGTON, Dec 09, 2008 /PRNewswire-USNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Pew Center on the States and the JEHT Foundation Commit $8 Million in 2009 to Modernize Election System

THE NEW MEXICO 2006 POST ELECTION AUDIT REPORT

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Thad E. Hall
Journal: 
Collaboration with The University of New Mexico, Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, University of Utah
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
During the 2007 legislative session, the New Mexico Legislature passed a bill and Governor Richardson signed it into law, which provides for random voting system audits after every statewide general election (see §1-14-13.1, NMSA). Specifically, the law provides that county clerks are to compare the total votes tallied in the general election for the office of president or governor from a random selection of 2% of the voting systems used during the election throughout the state to a hand count of the ballots cast on that system. A voting system is

Voting Online Around The World

Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
R. Michael Alvarez
Journal: 
Voting in America Volume 3
pp: 
137-143
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
In 2000 there were a number of notable efforts in the United States to use Internet voting. In that year, two presidential primary elections-the Alaska Republican "straw poll" and the Arizona Democratic primary-included remote Internet access as one channel for voting (along with traditional by-mail and in­precinct voting).

Flooding The Vote: Hurricane Katrina and Voter Participation in New Orleans

Working Paper No.: 
70
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
R
The flooding of New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina resulted in a massive and rapid exodus of individuals from New Orleans to locations around the United States. In the midst of the hurricane recovery, the City of New Orleans reelected Mayor Ray Nagin to a second term in office. Arguments regarding when this election would be held were

Who Should Run Elections in the United States?

Author(s): 
Morgan Llewellyn
Caltech
Thad E. Hall
Journal: 
Policy Studies Journal
pp: 
325-346
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Much has been said since the 2000 presidential election regarding the administration of elections in the United States, particularly about how election administrators are selected and to whom they are responsive. Unfortunately, there has been little research on the different administrative structures that are possible and the preferences of Americans regarding these different administrative options.

Minnesota challenge variability

The real action in the Minnesota recount will be the ballots challenged by the two campaigns on the grounds that the voter intent was not properly ascertained. These challenged ballots are emerging even when the county recounts show no discrepancy with the count of the ballots successfully scanned by the machines. As I suggested in an earlier posting, this is an illustration of why the post-election audit is not an especially good predictor of what will happen in the recount.

Minnesota challenge variability

The real action in the Minnesota recount will be the ballots challenged by the two campaigns on the grounds that the voter intent was not properly ascertained. These challenged ballots are emerging even when the county recounts show no discrepancy with the count of the ballots successfully scanned by the machines. As I suggested in an earlier posting, this is an illustration of why the post-election audit is not an especially good predictor of what will happen in the recount.

Detecting Fraud in America’s Gilded Age

Working Paper No.: 
2
Date Published: 
07/01/2008
Author(s): 
Gail Buttorff
University of Iowa
Abstract: This paper extends recent developments in election forensics to test for electoral fraud during a period of American history widely suspected to be ripe with fraud. It uses the second-digit Benford’s Law test in an effort to identify possible instances of election fraud during the Gilded Age—an era of highly competitive party politics. The study focuses on presidential and gubernatorial elections in Southern US states during the period from 1872 to 1896. The empirical results corroborate some of the extant historical anecdotes of electoral fraud during this period.

MIT IST News

Link to Article: 
Newspaper: 
MIT IST News
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Robyn Fizz
Op-Ed
The 2000 presidential election is remembered for Florida’s hanging chads and highly controversial recount. The 2004 presidential election was similarly contentious, with concerns about improper voting procedures in several states, including the swing state of Ohio. Aspects of the entire voting process were called into question, from voter registration, to the unequal distribution of voting machines, to the accuracy of the count. Will the voting process be fairer and the final tally more accurate in 2008? And how will voting technology come into play?

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