Electronic Voting

Auditing Technology for Electronic Voting Machines

Working Paper No.: 
46
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Sharon Cohen
Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machine security has been a significant topic of contention ever since Diebold voting machine code turned up on a public internet site in 2003 and computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University declared the machine “unsuitable for use in a general election.” Since then, many people from computer scientists to politicians have begun to insist that DREs be equipped with a paper trail. A paper trail provides a paper printout for the voter to approve at the end of each voting session.

Auditing Technology for Electronic Voting Machines

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Sharon Cohen
Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machine security has been a significant topic of contention ever since Diebold voting machine code turned up on a public internet site in 2003 and computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University declared the machine “unsuitable for use in a general election.” Since then, many people from computer scientists to politicians have begun to insist that DREs be equipped with a paper trail. A paper trail provides a paper printout for the voter to approve at the end of each voting session.

An N-Version Electronic Voting System

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Soyini D. Liburd
The ballot battles of the 2000 US Presidential Election clearly indicate that existing voting technologies and processes are not sufficient to guarantee that every eligible voter is granted their right to vote and implicitly to have that vote counted, as per the fifteenth, nineteenth, twenty fourth and twenty sixth amendments to the US constitution. Developing a voting system that is secure, correct, reliable and trustworthy is a significant challenge to current technology.

American Attitudes about Electronic Voting, Results of a National Survey

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Thad E. Hall
This study examines current attitudes of the American electorate toward electronic voting. This issue is critical to understand, given the highly argumentative debate going on among media and political elites on this topic, as well as the movement in many states and localities toward electronic voting systems. If American voters lack confidence in electronic voting systems--or for that matter all the various voting systems they may use in this fall's presidential election--the basic integrity of our democratic system could be in jeopardy.

Processes Can Improve Electronic Voting: A Case Study of An Election

Working Paper No.: 
19
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Across the United States, I have personally watched hundreds of precincts vote since 2001. Most recently, I traveled to Reno/Sparks, Nevada to observe the rollout of the Sequoia Direct record electronic voting systems with verifiable paper trail printers on September 7, 2004. This experience was also enriched by the members of the Secretary of State of California’s poll-watching effort, who invited me to join them to watch the election progress at eleven different polling places, which together represent almost forty different precincts.

An N-Version Electronic Voting System

Working Paper No.: 
17
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Soyini D. Liburd
MIT
The ballot battles of the 2000 US Presidential Election clearly indicate that existing voting technologies and processes are not sufficient to guarantee that every eligible voter is granted their right to vote and implicitly to have that vote counted, as per the fifteenth, nineteenth, twenty fourth and twenty sixth amendments to the US constitution. Developing a voting system that is secure, correct, reliable and trustworthy is a significant challenge to current technology.

The SAVE System: Secure Architecture for Voting Electronically

Working Paper No.: 
12
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Jonathan Goler
MIT
Ted Selker
Existing technology is capable of yielding secure, reliable, and auditable voting systems. This system outlines an architecture based on redundancy at each stage of the ballot submission process that is resistant to external hacking and internal insertion of malicious code. The proposed architecture addresses all layers of the system beyond the point when a voter commits the ballot. These steps include the verification of eligibility to vote, authentication, and aggregation of the vote.

Report to the Alexandria Board of Elections

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
During the 2002 general election, the Alexandria Board of Elections tested the Hart Intercivic eSlate voting system as a first step in determining how well an electronic voting system would work in the City of Alexandria. There are three key findings from the evaluation of this system.
  1. Alexandria voters are comfortable and satisfied with the current voting system that they have. Voters like the optical scan system and use it quite adeptly.

Fixing the Vote

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Journal: 
Scientific American
pp: 
92-97
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Electronic voting machines promise to make elections more accurate than ever before, but only if certain problems -- with the machines and the wider electoral process -- are rectified.
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